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Charles Russell Prints


Cheyennes Watching Union Pacific Track Layers
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Item Number: R10 (Full Set of 10)
Publisher's Price: $800.00
Image Size: Embossed 16"x 10"
Paper Size: 18"x 24"
Edition Size: 50 Sets
 
When, on May 10, 1869, the golden spike was driven at Promontory, Utah, which marked the meeting of the rails laid westward from Omaha by the Union Pacific and those set eastward by the Central Pacific from Sacramento, the final act in the conquest of the great trans-Mississippi region had been accomplished. Although the little fanfare and even less support, the size of the project had begun to be appreciated and was attracting the attention of the civilized world as the opposing railroad forces neared each other.

It was an unbelievably difficult and dangerous undertaking. While one army of men, labored, it took another army to protect them from hostile indians. Most of the men employed on the Union Pacific had been soldiers in the Union army. Accustomed to camp life, they learned to jump to arms, day or night, when the cry, "Sioux," was heard. Up and down the steel tracks that cross the continent from east to west are the unmarked graves of the trail makers; countless men who were victims not only of Indians, but also of disease or a dozen other mischances of construction camp life.

 
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Charles Russell Prints